Transit Etiquette (Ride with Respect)

Be Kind, Be Courteous


This post was originally going to be a part of my overall Transit 101 series. However, I thought it would be best to make it a completely separate post so that I can emphasize how important it is to not only have a peaceful bus or train ride, but to also ensure that others on board have that same level of peace as well.


The basics

My fictional character Nick is a police officer. He boards transit buses & trains often to help make sure that things are as peaceful & orderly as possible. Nick knows what he should & should not do while using public transit & does his best to make sure that the rules of the road & rail are enforced at all times. Keep in mind though, just because there may not be an authority figure like a police officer on board your transit vehicle – doesn’t mean you can go about making your transit ride miserable for yourself & others.

While some transit agencies may have specific rules & regulations regarding fare collection, pets & bicycles on transit vehicles, & other matters, the following is a relatively universal list of do’s & don’ts while using public transit.

Do’s

Don’ts

  • Have your fare media ready for immediate use & inspection before boarding a transit vehicle or entering a station turnstile. If you are qualified to pay reduced fares, please have appropriate accompanying ID ready as well.
  • Dress appropriately. While this doesn’t necessarily mean dress up in your Sunday’s best each time you use transit, please be thoughtful in what you wear because you are in a public place. Virtually all transit agencies require you to wear a shirt, appropriate bottoms, & shoes at all times.
  • Remain seated at all times. If standing due to capacity issues, please do not stand in prohibited areas of the transit vehicle – which are clearly marked.
  • If bringing a folding cart, please make sure that the cart is folded & not blocking aisles.
  • You are welcome to listen to music or otherwise use your portable media device or smartphone while on board transit vehicles. However, you are asked to use headphones when playing any sort of media.
  • If taking a cell phone call while on board, please keep conversations as quiet as possible & to a minimum.
  • Always dispose of trash & recyclables into their respective receptacles.
  • Do not talk to the transit operator while he or she is driving the transit vehicle.
  • Do not eat or drink while on board the transit vehicle (note that bottled water & baby formula are typically considered exceptions – assuming that the container can be easily sealed closed.
  • Do not bring alcoholic beverages on board the transit vehicle – these are strictly prohibited in most jurisdictions.
  • Do not smoke while on board the transit vehicle (this includes electronic cigarettes & the like – transit agencies are taking notice & are banning such devices accordingly)
  • Do not bring other unsafe electronic/mobility devices on board the transit vehicle (things like hoverboards & motorized gas bikes).
  • Do not bring flammable or otherwise hazardous chemicals & such on board the transit vehicle.
  • Do not lean against, hold open, or block exit doors.
  • Do not travel in between moving train cars – unless a provision exists to do so – such as articulated gangways.
  • Do not solicit products or services while on board the transit vehicle. Many transit agencies prohibit solicitation while on board a transit vehicle or at a transit facility.

Some additional don’ts…

  • Do not commit any act of violence against anyone on board the transit vehicle – including transit employees.
  • Do not commit any act of vandalism to a transit vehicle or other piece of transit agency property.
  • Do not engage in any other disruptive, aggressive, disturbing, or otherwise discourteous behavior towards others – including transit employees.
  • Do not litter – especially at rail stations, where trash can easily fall onto the tracks & result in track fires.
  • Roller skating, roller, blading, and skate boarding are not allowed.

Bus specifics

Below are some additional, but specific things to keep in mind while on board a transit bus.

If standing while inside the bus, your feet should not be in front of the yellow safety line, as depicted here.
  • Yellow Safety Line
    • When the bus becomes standing room only, it’s important not to step forward of the yellow safety line that is located just behind the operator’s seat. This is so you’re not encroaching upon the operator’s field of vision – especially if he or she needs to look towards the right for any reason. Additionally, you risk violating the operator’s personal space if you do. Also, you don’t want to be in the way of the wheelchair ramp if it needs to be activated.
  • Windows
    • Some buses have opening windows in the passenger area. Unless instructed by the operator, you should not open the windows.
  • Wheelchair boarding
    • When boarding the bus, if at all possible, allow the customer using the mobility device to board first. Or, if that individual is boarding after the fact, board and remain clear of the “Priority Seating” area towards the front of the bus so that the individual can board & be secured. When exiting, please use the rear door if one is present, or allow the individual using the mobility device to exit first.
    • Never inhibit the operator’s duties to ensure that the mobility device is properly secured!!!
Credit: Palm Tran.

Rail Specifics

Below are some additional, but specific things to keep in mind while on board a passenger rail train.

  • Yellow Safety Line
    • While I’ve discussed the subject of the yellow safety line on board the transit bus, it takes on a slightly different context when relating to passenger rail networks. Here, the safety line is to indicate the edge of the elevated platform so that you don’t accidentally fall onto the tracks. While many systems indicate the platform edge via a yellow line, some may indicate this via a blue, orange, or red line. In order to comply with accessibility laws, these platform edge markers are often comprised of ribbed surfaces so that those with visual impairments can be alerted.
  • Emergency Brakes
    • Too often, I hear of situations where a passenger rail train – especially a subway train – being stopped suddenly because someone has pulled the emergency brake handles. This is not only heavily inconvenient for those on board the train, but it’s also a major safety implication for the entire rail network because transit agency staff have to reset all of the necessary mechanisms to get the train moving again, which also in-turn, leads to system-wide delays. Thus, pulling the emergency brakes should only be done in an actual emergency.
  • Dangers of walking between trains
    • Another thing I hear of too often, especially in the realm of the subways, is people traveling in between railcars. Unless a provision exists – such as an interconnecting gangway that allows for safe passage between train cars, you should never try to travel between train cars unless instructed to by transit agency staff. Doing so can lead to serious injury or even death if you wind up getting thrown off the train.

Other things to keep in mind

  • Priority Seating
    • The seats closest to the operator on board buses & select areas on board (subway/metro & commuter rail) trains are often marked as “Priority Seating”, meaning that you should always offer these seats to those who need them – including the elderly, persons with disabilities, & expectant mothers. But also, these are the areas that are often designated for those who use mobility devices – such as wheelchairs. If a customer boards using a mobility device, you will need to immediately vacate your seat & allow space for the customer’s mobility device to be secured.
  • Pets on Transit
    • Some transit agencies allow small pets to travel on board vehicles, but only if they are in a carrier & is not blocking any aisles. Please check with your respective transit agency for details.
  • Allow arriving customers to exit the vehicle first before boarding
    • As a courtesy, you should always allow arriving customers to exit the bus or train first before boarding.
  • Treating the transit operator with respect
    • Whether you’re riding a bus or a train, it’s important to treat the operator & other transit agency staff members with the utmost respect. They have a very tough job to do & the pay & benefits may not be as good as you may think they are, so please…be kind, courteous, & respectful to them.

With all of the above said, please have a safe & wonderful transit journey!


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Service Alert: New Orleans RTA


Post was last updated on 11/01/2019.


By now, you most likely have heard about the horrible incident that occurred near the historic French Quarter in New Orleans, LA. The Hard Rock Hotel, which was under construction, partially collapsed – leaving many injured, as well as claiming at least one or two lives. Our thoughts & prayers go out to all those affected by this incident & their families.

What to expect if using transit in the area.

Due to numerous streets surrounding the hotel site being closed off, the New Orleans Regional Transit Authority has detoured bus routes that would typically traverse these affected streets. Additionally, the Riverfront & Rampart – St. Claude Streetcar Lines have been suspended in their entirety while the Canal Streetcar has been partially suspended. Bus substitutions will be in effect during these closures.

Previously, affected Central Business District bus routes have been congregating at the NORTA headquarters at 2817 Canal St. Since 10/23/19, temporary transfer hub operations have shifted to Duncan Plaza at 343 Loyola Ave. This second shift was supposed to occur on 10/19/19, but due to difficulties caused by the demolition of the cranes surrounding the Hard Rock site, the move was postponed.

Customers should expect longer than normal travel times as a result. The RTA will be dispatching additional staff to help assist customers in getting to where they need to go. For further information, please contact the New Orleans RTA.


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HART July 4th Holiday Service & July Service Changes

Plus holiday schedules for other selected transit agencies

This combined post will cover special holiday service that Hillsborough Area Regional Transit (HART) will be launching for the July 4th holiday, holiday schedules for the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) & a few others, plus go over approved service changes for HART that will take place on Sunday, July 14, 2019.


So what exactly is HART doing for July 4?

Generally, HART has provided some form of extra transit service for the July 4th evening festivities – including extended streetcar service. However this year, they will be running two special complimentary shuttles in the downtown Tampa area to help shuttle people between points in downtown & the Marion Transit Center. This will make it convenient for those who don’t want to hassle with parking in downtown.

A map of the complimentary HART services during July 4th holiday festivities. Click on the image to view the full PDF file.

In addition to the above services, HART will operate its entire system FARE FREE that day. Just keep in mind that all routes will operate on a Sunday schedule & not all routes operate through 12-midnight. Below is a quick rundown of what times the last buses depart the Marion Transit Center.

  • Route 1 – Florida Ave Corridor: 10:05pm
  • Route 5 – 40th St Corridor: 10:00pm
  • Route 6 – 56th St Corridor: 11:00pm
  • Route 7 – West Tampa: 10:00pm
  • Route 9 – 15th/30th Streets: 10:00pm
  • Route 12 – 22nd St Corridor: 10:00pm
  • Route 19 – South Tampa: 10:00pm
  • Route 30 – Kennedy Blvd Corridor/TPA Airport: 12:05am
  • Route 60LX – TPA Airport: 10:00pm
  • MetroRapid Nebraska: 12:00am
  • Routes 8 & 275LX end prior to 9:30pm & thus aren’t listed here.

For schedule information, visit the HART website.
For information on the July 4th festivities – Boom by the Bay, visit the City of Tampa website.


July 4th holiday transit schedules elsewhere

Many transit agencies across the nation will operate limited to no service due to the holiday. Please be sure to plan accordingly if using transit.

  • Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA), Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA), StarMetro, the Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (LYNX), & Miami-Dade Transit will also operate a Sunday schedule.
  • Votran will operate on a special holiday schedule. Please view the website for details.
  • Many other agencies – such as Pasco County Public Transportation & Sarasota County Area Transit (SCAT) will not operate. SunRail in Orlando will also not operate.

HART July Service Changes

Finally, I’d like to quickly highlight some of the system changes that HART will be rolling out on Sunday, July 14, 2019. These changes will mostly comprise of minor scheduling/time point changes, but three routes will be changed to help restore service lost during the Mission MAX system restructuring in 2017.

Schedules can be viewed on the HART website by selecting the menu button on the upper-right-hand corner, then selecting “Maps & Schedules”, then selecting “System Map & Schedules”, then selecting the routes drop-down box, & then scrolling down to the bottom listing within the drop-down that reads “HART Service Changes, Effective 7/14/19 – Coming Soon”.

  • Route 16 – Waters Ave: Will continue to serve the Rowlett Park loop on eastbound trips. However, buses will travel to the Yukon Transfer Center via Florida Ave after completing the loop & layover at the transfer facility. Buses will then travel straight to Northwest Transfer Center going westbound.
  • Route 30 – Kennedy Blvd/TPA Airport: Service in the WestShore Business District will be altered to restore fixed transit service to Cypress Point Park & the Social Security Administration offices off Cypress St. This area used to be served by Route 10 prior to its elimination during Mission MAX.
  • Route 39 – Busch Blvd: After completing the southbound/eastbound jog on Puritan Rd, 50th St, & Sligh Ave, buses will terminate at the NetPark Transfer Center. Westbound buses will not service 50th St & will continue directly to Northwest Transfer Center. Service to Yukon Transfer Center will NOT be restored at this time. It is unclear what HART may do in the future.
  • Routes 7, 8, 35, 37, and 38 will see minor scheduling changes during the weekdays, with Routes 14, 16, 30, 39, 45, and 46 seeing minor scheduling changes during the entire week.

I will begin updating my HART section here on the Global Transit Guidebook website soon. This will include a brand new route listing, an expanded transit vehicle photo gallery, & updated customer information.


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Friday Rewind – 2008 HART Fleet Repainting

Out with the old & in with the new.



In this month’s Friday Rewind, I take a look back at when Hillsborough Area Regional Transit (HART) began repainting their bus fleet. When I began riding HART in 2006, most of their buses still donned the late 90’s era “HARTline” white with red/blue/green ribbons scheme. The only exception was the 2005 & 2006-series buses which had the same scheme that is used today, but in a purple/gray tone. The latter buses signified the overall transition from the “HARTline” days to the modern era, but that transition – little known to me at the time – was not yet complete.

Now retired bus # 2015 at Britton Plaza. This was a 2000-series bus that had been involved in an accident a few months prior to this sighting & was repainted as part of work done to repair the damage from the accident.

Here’s what I wrote in my original post back on August 13, 2008.

Some of you may have noticed in recent weeks that many of HART’s buses look like they’re literally going to the dogs. Especially in respects to the exterior paint being scratched away in some areas.

Rest assured; the entire fleet is in good hands. In fact, a couple buses rolled out this week with a fresh coat of paint. The blue, navy, and white livery matches the style of the purple, violet, and white livery that is already seen on Commuter Express buses. However, I assume that HART chose the color scheme to better match the buses to the agency’s logo, which is also navy and blue.

The Global Transit Guidebook by HARTride 2012 –
https://globaltransitguidebook.com/2008/08/13/hart-rolls-out-repainted-buses-for-local-routes-amid-reporting-record-ridership-levels/

The new livery is only a part of the many changes that HART’s fleet of buses are going through at the present time. You may have read the post regarding the installation of GPS and automated annunciation systems, as well as security cameras, on all buses. Well those systems seem to be fully functional since my last ride on the Route 19 in late July. I don’t know how extensive the GPS system operates, but I’m sure we will be seeing real-time message boards at some transfer centers in the not too distant future, so that patrons will be able to know exactly when the next bus departs.

The Global Transit Guidebook by HARTride 2012 –
https://globaltransitguidebook.com/2008/08/13/hart-rolls-out-repainted-buses-for-local-routes-amid-reporting-record-ridership-levels/

As mentioned above, other changes were occurring with HART’s fleet at the time, including installation of GPS, surveillance, and automated announcement systems – all of which are still in use but are slated for upgrades in the coming months. There was also a short-lived trial of having LCD screens at the Marion Transit Center that displayed real-time departure information. This project eventually went to the wayside in favor of the OneBusAway app.


Wondering how HART’s livery has evolved over the years? Simply view the gallery below:


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HART, JTA, & LYNX Spring Service Changes

It’s that time again…


…time for several transit agencies to enact service changes.

On Sunday, March 24, 2019, Hillsborough Area Regional Transit will be enacting several routing &/or scheduling changes to improve efficiency. The Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) will do the same on Monday, April 1, 2019, followed by the Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (d.b.a. LYNX) on Sunday, April 28, 2019.

Service changes are summarized below by transit agency:


Hillsborough Area Regional Transit
Tampa, FL

What’s Changing?

  • Route 7: Running time changes on weekdays to reflect travel patterns.
  • Route 14: One-way looping at the northern end of the line will cease. Buses will travel bi-directionally from the Yukon Transfer Center to Florida Ave, Linebaugh Ave, and then down Armenia Ave.
  • Route 31: Service along Duncan Rd will cease. Buses will travel along US 301 between Duncan and Bloomingdale Ave, then use Bloomingdale between US 301 & Providence Rd. Southbound running times in SouthShore will also be adjusted.
  • Routes 37 & 38: Running time changes during weekday PM rush to reflect travel patterns.
  • Route 400 – MetroRapid North-South: Minor routing change in Downtown Tampa. Northbound buses will use Florida Ave instead of Morgan St to approach the Marion Transit Center. There will be no stops added. Customers can use Routes 1 or 19 along Florida Ave to get to the MTC.

Where can I get more information?

On the HART website, or by calling (813)-254-4278.


Jacksonville Transportation Authority
Jacksonville, FL

What’s Changing?

  • Route 13: Running time changes.
  • Route 15: Running time changes.
  • Route 21: Running time changes.
  • Route 25: Running time changes.
  • Route 32: Southern terminus will shift to Rosa Parks Transit Station in Downtown Jacksonville. Direct service to St. Vincent’s Memorial Hospital in Riverside will cease.
  • Route 33: Running time changes. Saturday frequency will change from 1 hour/20 minutes to 1 hour/30 minutes. Routes 32 & 33 will become interlined.
  • Route 53: Running time changes.
  • Route 84: Running time changes.
  • First Coast Flyer Lines (102/Green, 107/Blue, 109/Red): Running time changes.

Where can I get more information?

On the JTA website, or by calling (904) 630-3100.


Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (LYNX)
Orlando, FL

What’s Changing?

  • Route 15: Minor schedule adjustments.
  • LYMMO Services (Routes 60, 61, 62, & 63): Route 61 will have a new stop at Amelia St @ Terry Ave. All four LYMMO routes will see frequency & service span changes.
  • Route 155: Buses will travel between Greenwald Way & Centerview Blvd via Osceola Pkwy.
  • Routes 301 & 304: Minor schedule adjustments.
  • Route 407 (FastLink): During the morning peak, trips to Lake Nona will first serve the VA Medical Center. Morning peak inbound trips to Kissimmee will serve Nemours Children’s Hospital and the USTA National Campus. Midday and afternoon peak service will remain unchanged, except for minor schedule adjustments.
  • Route 441 (FastLink): Northbound & Southbound trips will begin serving the bus stop on S. Orange Blossom Trl & Centerview Blvd.
  • Flex (NeighborLink) Route 613: Zone will be extended northward to include the Park Promenade Plaza.

Where can I get more information?

On the LYNX website, or by calling (407)-841-5969.


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Toronto Blue Jays Spring Training Transportation

Park for free, Ride for free…


Baseball Spring Training is back, which means heading out to the stadium, fighting traffic, battling to find a good parking spot, & maybe having to pay to get into the lot in the process.

It doesn’t have to be that way if you’re heading to Dunedin Stadium to watch the Toronto Blue Jays though. The city of Dunedin, the Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA), & the Clearwater Jolley Trolley, have teamed up to provide a free Park-N-Ride lot in downtown Dunedin, along with free Jolley Trolley service to and from the stadium. The promotion begins Saturday, February 23, 2019 & runs until Friday, March 22, 2019.

For further information, please select from one of the following links. Please be advised that game dates & times are subject to change.


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PSTA Express Routes Revisited

Moving Towards Better Express Bus Service In Tampa Bay



Post was updated on 03/03/2019.
Information has been added regarding the planned start of the PSTA/FDOT shoulder-running pilot project on I-275.


The last time I wrote a post on my experiences on Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority (PSTA) Routes 100X & 300X was way back in 2012. Lots have changed since that time – including me moving over to Pinellas County & PSTA changing the routing and schedules for both routes. In this post, I will provide an update on where these routes are now and where we’re heading.


Route 100X

Ever since it was established, the 100X has always traveled between Downtown Tampa & Gateway Mall in St. Petersburg. Originally, the route was operated by Hillsborough Area Regional Transit (HART), but was handed over to PSTA in 1990. Frequency has greatly varied over the years, with departures ranging between 30 minute peak headways and 60 minute off-peak headways, with limited midday service. However, the biggest limitation of the 100X is that current funding levels do not allow it to run on weekends – creating a large void for those who want to cross into Hillsborough County and vice versa all week long.

PSTA Route 100X map. Select the image to view the current schedule.

While the map can look a bit intimidating, one thing to note is that only certain marked stops are served. In some areas, the bus will serve nearly all localized stops, while in other areas, buses will only serve selected intersections. It is important to know which stops serve the 100X so that you can properly catch the bus.

You’ll be able to spot a 100X stop by the two above indicators: GREEN – the 100X label on the standard PSTA bus stop & RED: a special designation sign indicating that the 100X bus stop here.
  • Downtown St. Petersburg
    • A vast majority of designated PSTA stops along portions of 1st Ave N & 1st Ave S are served, as well as selected stops along other downtown corridors. Buses use I-275 & I-375 to traverse between 54th Ave N & Downtown St. Pete. Please note that there are currently no stops along 54th Ave N.
  • Fossil Park
    • Buses travel northbound only on 4th St N between 54th Ave N & 77th Ave N & southbound only on MLK St N between 77th Ave N & 54th Ave N. Only selected stops at selected intersections are served.
  • Gateway Mall Transfer Center: Connections are available to Routes 4, 9, 16, 58, 74, & 75.
  • South Gateway
    • From the Gateway Mall Transfer Center stop to Gandy Blvd via MLK St N, 83rd Ave N, & 4th St N, almost all designated PSTA stops are served.
    • On Gandy Blvd, all designated PSTA stops are served, but stops are limited along the corridor approaching the Gandy Bridge.
  • South Tampa
    • Once in Hillsborough County, buses traverse Gandy Blvd from the bridge to Dale Mabry Hwy with localized stops available. Customers can connect with HART Route 17 at Manhattan Ave.
    • Buses then travel on Dale Mabry Hwy between Gandy and the Britton Plaza Transfer Center, with localized stops available. Customers can connect with HART Route 360LX anywhere along the corridor.
  • HART Britton Plaza Transfer Center: Connections are available to HART Routes 17, 19, 36, 360LX, & the South Tampa Flex route.
  • Downtown Tampa
    • After leaving Britton Plaza, buses go non-stop again, but via the Selmon Expressway, to travel to Downtown Tampa. Those wishing to access points along Dale Mabry Hwy between Britton Plaza & Bay to Bay Blvd, or Bay to Bay Blvd between Dale Mabry Hwy & MacDill Ave will need to use HART Route 360LX instead.
    • Once in Downtown Tampa, buses serve all stops along the Marion St Transitway & terminate at the HART Marion Transit Center North Platform. Customers can connect to either PSTA Route 300X, or a variety of HART services – including MetroRapid. Connections with MegaBus & RedCoach services are also available at the North Platform. Please visit www.gohart.org for a current listing of connections at the Marion Transit Center, as routes & boarding locations can change.

Route 300X

Route 300X was established in 2003 to allow customers in central Pinellas direct limited-stop access to Downtown Tampa. A Park-N-Ride lot (originally a KFC) is situated near the corner of Ulmerton Rd & Starkey Rd for customers who wish to leave their vehicles instead of crossing the Howard Frankland Bridge. Customers from Routes 59 & 73 are also able to easily access the facility. In 2016, the lot received a much-needed facelift that included lot resurfacing, bus lane redesign, a new green space, & shelters.

Like the 100X, overall frequency on the 300X has varied since its 2003 launch, with initial frequency being every 30 minutes during peak hours & limited midday service. Over time, peak frequency has been cut back to every hour due to ridership pattern changes & funding constraints. Also like the 100X, there is also no weekend service. However, unlike the 100X, the 300X has always had limited stops throughout its entire journey (see the route map below).

In 2018, PSTA restructured & re-branded the 300X to serve Tampa International Airport’s public bus hub, located adjacent to its rental car center. This allows customers to leave their vehicles at home or park conveniently at the Ulmerton Park-N-Ride lot & catch a bus to the airport. To address rider concerns about connecting between the lot & Downtown Tampa (including HART’s Marion Transit Center) directly, one AM trip & one PM trip skips the airport.

As a result of the restructuring, the 300X is now referred to as the “Airport Express” & buses # 16101, 16103, & 16106 (all 2016 40-foot Gillig Low Floor hybrids) have sported special wrapping for the service. Additionally, some seating on these buses have been removed to accommodate luggage racks.

PSTA Route 300X map. Notice the limited number of designated stops? Select the image to view the current schedule.

What does the future hold?

Unless PSTA is able to locate additional funding avenues, such as the passage of a county-wide sales tax referendum, don’t expect too much to change with either express route. However, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) is currently working with PSTA on two projects that will affect the 100X.

The first is a shoulder-running pilot by which when congestion on I-275 becomes bad, buses will be allowed to run along a hardened outer shoulder to bypass traffic. The second is the redesign and usage of an FDOT-owned lot on 22nd Ave N by the interstate that is currently used for Tampa Bay Area Regional Transit Authority (TBARTA) sponsored carpools & vanpools. PSTA would be able to use the redesigned lot for Park-N-Ride operations for the 100X. Both projects are connected to the broader, yet controversial plan to bring variable toll lanes to I-275 and other thoroughfares throughout the region. FDOT also continues to provide funding support for both routes via its Urban Corridor Project.

On February 26, 2019, FDOT announced that construction of the revised shoulders on I-275 between Gandy Blvd & 5th Ave N will begin this fall, with scheduled completion & operation in early 2020. It is not clear when the Park-N-Ride project will commence.


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No New Funding Equals; Transit in Crisis Mode

Not having funds is not fun.

With the upcoming service changes, one would think that the Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (which does business under the banner of LYNX) wouldn’t be under any sort of financial distress. However, it became clear this month that the situation is otherwise.

Note: I originally planned to only talk about LYNX’s situation in this post. However, because the ongoing federal government shutdown is affecting virtually every transit agency in the US, I decided to combine topics into one post. The first section will discuss LYNX’s situation in specific, but then broaden out to the government shutdown is affecting transit nationwide.

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Winter 2019 Service Changes

It’s that time again…

It’s that time again, time to roll out the next batch of transit system service changes. Effective dates and scope of changes will vary greatly by transit agency. For this post, I’m going to divide each of the changes by transit agency and arrange by effective date.

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HART December, 2018 Service Changes

HART Routes 45, 60LX, 360LX, & the TECOline Streetcar

Hillsborough Area Regional Transit (HART) will be enacting a few route changes on Sunday, December 2, 2018. Changes include routing/scheduling changes to Routes 45, 60LX, & 360LX, as well as minor scheduling changes for the TECOline Streetcar Line.

Note: These changes were already in the works prior to the passage of the All For Transportation referendum & would have been enacted regardless of the election results on November 6, 2018.

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