December, 2018 Photo of the Month

Showcase Time!

Can you believe that 2018 is almost over? I certainly can’t. For the December Showcase, I decided to post a collage of various transit vehicles that I photographed this year. I hope you will enjoy the selection, as I do this each December.


The 2018 Year-End Transit Photo Collage – Select the image for a closer look.
From top to bottom, left to right: Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority # 18105, Hillsborough Area Regional Transit # 1717, Tampa International Airport SkyConnect # 02, Manatee County Area Transit # 59103, Jacksonville Transportation Authority # B014, Flagler County Public Transportation #99, Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (d.b.a. LYNX) # 141-313, SunRail locomotive # 105.

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November, 2018 Photo of the Month

Gainesville Regional Transit System (RTS) # 1807 on layover. Photo courtesy of Sean W.

The November “Showcase” photo is of a relatively new bus this time, # 1807 from the Gainesville Regional Transit System (RTS) in Gainesville, FL. This is one of eleven 2018-series 40-foot Gillig Low Floor buses that the agency ordered to replace its oldest buses. The photo shown here was taken by Global Transit Guidebook Forum moderator Sean W.

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September 2018 Photo of the Month

Trinity Metro #1105 on layover. Photo courtesy of Carlos A.

For the September, 2018 Photo of the Month, I decided to once again offer members in The Global Transit Enthusiast Lounge an opportunity to contribute their transit photos. Each contribution was then put up for a vote to see which one would grace the cover of my social media pages/groups and become the Showcase photo for September as well.

The winning photo was taken by our social media moderator Carlos A. and shows Trinity Metro (in Fort Worth, TX) bus #1105 on layover during its run on Route 67X, which operates Monday through Friday and connects the South and Southeast campuses of Tarrant Community College. Bus #1105 is a 2015 40′ Gillig Low Floor bus that is fueled by Compressed Natural Gas (CNG). Many transit agencies in Texas have CNG-powered buses in their fleets in addition to diesel units.

Now this isn’t the first time that the 67X designation has come about, as there were two previous versions on the 67 that were eliminated. One of which was an ultra-express connecting Dallas with Fort Worth. I’m guessing that this incarnation was later replaced by the Trinity Railway Express (TRE) commuter rail that opened in 1996. In addition to the TRE, Trinity Metro is also constructing the TEXRail Commuter Rail line that will connect Downtown Fort Worth directly with Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.


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August 2018 Photo of the Month

Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) Streetcar #4135.
Photo Courtesy of Toby R.

For the August, 2018 Photo of the Month, I decided to offer members in The Global Transit Enthusiast Lounge an opportunity to contribute their transit photos. Each contribution was then put up for a vote to see which one would grace the cover of my social media pages/groups and become the Showcase photo for August as well.

The winning photo was taken by group member Toby R. and depicts Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) streetcar #4135 traveling to Neville Park on Line 501. The model train pictured is a 1980 or 1981 UTDC/Hawker Siddeley CLRV L-2. While the older stock has been well maintained, they are slowly being phased out in favor of newer LRVs manufactured by Bombardier. Because of various issues with Bombardier, the rollout of the new LRVs has been painstakingly slow, leaving many of the older trains to see another day in revenue service – at least through 2019.

The TTC streetcar system is among a handful of streetcar lines that still operate in North America – as many were torn apart during the course of the 1940s, 50s, and 60s in favor of buses and personal automobiles. The TTC at one point even considered giving up on its own streetcar lines because of the high cost of maintenance and restoration of crumbling infrastructure. However, public pressure led to the TTC keeping many of its streetcar segments running.

July, 2018 Photo of the Month

Hillsborough Area Regional Transit #2701 on Route 97.

July is here! Meaning that we’re halfway through 2018, and Summer is well underway. As many of us prepare for the July 4th holiday here in the US, some may not be aware that Hillsborough Area Regional Transit enacts its summer, 2018 service changes today. Among those changes are new Routes 48 and 275LX, but also the discontinuation of Route 51LX and the In-Towner Trolley services.

The selection of July’s Photo of the Month could not be anymore perfect when it comes to paying homage to a trolleybus service that has been in existence in Downtown Tampa since its people mover line was dismantled in the early 2000s. The line was supposed to have been part of a larger system – like Miami’s MetroMover – but failed to gain any traction. Thus what was originally known as the Uptown-Downtown Connector was launched as a replacement service.

Over the years, HART has made various changes to how the trolleybus lines operate – from routing and scheduling, to fares and vehicles, to gauging who’s riding each day. Over time though, ridership was somewhat limited and by 2007, began to really falter. An evening and weekend segment through Hyde Park (Route 98) was axed, and then the Downtown Tampa loop (Route 96) was reduced to weekday peak-hour service only. Through it all, two iterations of a riverside service (Route 97) came and went.

As the overall transportation landscape in the urban Tampa core changes to host more on-demand services such as Uber and the Tampa Downtown Partnership-operated Downtowner shuttle, it remains to be seen as to whether the area will get a true, frequent circulator service. Some like myself argue that such a service is needed to quickly get people from Hyde Park and West Tampa into Downtown and Channelside, and thus supplement the future TECOline Streetcar extension towards Tampa Heights. Questions also remain as to whether HART will take over the Downtowner shuttle, which is currently being discussed.


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June, 2018 Photo of the Month

HART #1720 on layover at the Marion Transit Center.

The June “Photo of the Month” is Hillsborough Area Regional Transit bus #1720, which is one of ten 2017-series 40′ Gillig BRT Plus CNG transit buses that the agency received last year. This purchase was made possible thanks to a Federal Transit Administration grant that was awarded to the agency. From what I understand, the agency is trying to apply for the same grant this year to fund additional bus replacements for 2019. Such replacements will allow HART to phase out the aging 2005 and possibly 2006 transit buses – which were brand new when I began riding HART back in 2006. How time sure flies! I miss the new bus smell on the 2005 and 2006-series buses.


Each month, I post a photo to be showcased here on the website, as well as on my Social Media channels. Please feel free to contact me if there is a transit photo that you would like me to showcase as part of my “Photo of the Month” series.


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May, 2018 Photo of the Month

MTA NYCT #5618 (2002 or 2003) New Flyer D60HF articulated transit bus on layover near The Cooper Union. This is among several buses that are currently being retired.

May’s “Photo of the Month” showcase is New York City Transit #5618, which is either a 2002 or 2003 New Flyer D60HF articulated transit bus. These buses were originally designated as the D60 prior to the manufacturing of low floor buses and are also known by their nickname, the “Galaxy”. I got to ride one of these buses along the M79 “Crosstown” route in Manhattan prior to its conversion to Select Bus Service (BRT Lite). Upon the conversion, the D60HFs were immediately replaced by newer Nova LFS and New Flyer Xcelsior articulated models.

Like many older transit buses, the D60HF is no longer being manufactured, as New Flyer only produces its Xcelsior low floor line of transit buses. The remaining buses are being replaced by such newer buses, as well as newer model Nove LFS articulated units. It won’t be much longer before there’s only a handful of these buses left in service, so I know of many transit enthusiasts who are trying to get their final batches of photos, videos, and bus rides in before 2018 comes to a close. Like many retired bus fleets in the New York City metro region, I expect one or two (maybe three or four) units to be preserved by the New York Transit Museum and perhaps a few other units preserved by other transit museums.

April, 2018 Photo of the Month

HART #1721 departs Britton Plaza on Route 19.

After taking a few months hiatus, the “Photo of the Month” showcase is back with Hillsborough Area Regional Transit (HART) bus #1721. This is one of ten 2017 40′ Gillig Low Floor buses that the agency purchased using funds from a Federal Transit Administration (FTA) grant, adding to a 15-bus order that the agency already placed back in 2016.

Besides continuing HART’s trend of replacing older diesel buses with compressed natural gas (CNG) ones, this fleet (which ranges from #’s 1716 through 1725) was the first to feature the sleek BRT Plus styling that Gillig has provided its customers for the past few years. The Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority (LYNX), Palm Tran, and the Jacksonville Transportation Authority (JTA) are the three other Florida transit agencies that have these styled Gillig buses in their fleets.

The Gillig BRT Plus design differs from their regular BRT design in the sense that the sleek roof faring stretches across the entire length of the bus, instead of just having curved front and rear ends.